Postcard – The Golden Rule I Learn’d at School – @1911

BROWNING Rose Postcard From Mary Front

BROWNING Rose Postcard From Mary Back

Postmarked: 22 November (1911?) Gravette, AR
To: Mrs. Rose Gray, Craig MO.

dear Rose, I have
bin looking for a
letter or some of you
to come down how
are you all we are
well having the
finest weather I
ever saw write
me a long letter
with love to
you all
Mary

Rose visited Mary and wrote home to her husband here. I have figured out that Mary is Rose’s cousin. Rose is the daughter of Elias William Browning (1829-1910) and Anna Elizabeth Galloway (1834-1893). Mary B. Tolby is the daughter of Elias’ sister Almeda Browning Tolby (1833-1888) and Andrew Jackson Tolby (1833-1890.) Mary was married to Benjamin F. McNiel (1859-unknown.)

Postcard – Dear Husband, August 1912

GRAY Alex BROWNING Rose Postcard Front 1912

GRAY Alex BROWNING Rose Postcard Back 1912

Postmarked: 15 August 1912 Gravette AR
To: Mr. Alex Gray, Craig Mo Holt County

August 15, 1912
Dear Husband,
This is the first
chance I have
to even write with you
since you was
at Sedalia am
well but this is
a lonesome old place
was over in Ok
lahoma yesterday
like the looks of
the country it is
fine with love to
all 
Rose Gray

Rose Althea Browning Gray was writing from Gravette, Arkansas (Benton County in Northwest Arkansas, about 10 miles from the Oklahoma border) to her husband Alex Gray at home in Craig, Missouri. She is about to turn 58 years old. She was likely visiting her cousin Mary Tolby McNiel.

Postcard – Public Bath House, Paseo, Kansas City, MO

BROWNING Rose GRAY Lula Bathhouse Postcard front

BROWNING Rose GRAY Lula Bathhouse Postcard Back

Postmarked: February 9, 1916, Kansas City MO
Addressed to: Mrs. Rose Gray, Craig, MO

Kansas City, Mo. Feb. 9, 1916

Dear Sister:
Just got your letter &
will write to tell you to bring
Pa’s over-coat also his razor
& shaving brush. Don’t know
if you will get this if
you don’t we will have
to send them to him
later. Guess he is a little
better this morning but it
is a very little. I can’t get
down to where your train
comes in so you just come
up with the crowd & I will
be there some place close
to where you come in.
I will stay till Friday.
Ma can get some one to stay
with her to-morrow night.

Lula
(Along the side: “Bring the little razor strap with the string to it.”)

Lula Gray (1881-1973) is writing to her mother Rose Althea Browning Gray (1854-1938) and her sister Bernice Erma Gray (1888-1981) who lived at the family home. Pa is Alexander Gray (1856-1940.)

A history of this bath house can be found here:
http://kcparks.org/park/the-parade-park/

Postcard: To Dear Mother – 1913

BROWNINGRoseAltheaPostcardfrom GRAYLula-Front

BROWNINGRoseAltheaPostcardfrom GRAYLula-Back

Postmarked: 20 February 1913, Craig MO
To: Mrs. Alex Gray, Gower Mo c/o G. R. Hines

Dear Father and Mother:
Rec’d
your card and will
write
you a line to
let you know we are
getting along fine.
Aunt Han Ball died the
day you went away.
All went up there
that evening. Lester was
better yesterday but haven’t
heard today. How is
everybody. Lula

This postcard is from Lula Gray (1881-1973) in Craig, Missouri to her mother Rose Althea Browning Gray (1854-1938), 65 miles away in Gower, Missouri. Rose is Todd’s 2x Great Grandmother. Lula was 31 when the card was written, and married Allen Bowersox when she was 51.

Because the card was mailed to Mrs. Alex Gray in Gower MO c/o G.R. Hines, I think she was staying with her sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Gray Hines (1861-1931), who was married to George Robinson Hines (1856-1941). Alex & Rose Gray lived in Craig with their daughters Lula and Bernice Erma.

I didn’t know who Aunt Han Ball was, but with Missouri Death Records online I found Hannah Ellen Kruson Ball died in nearby Fairfax, Missouri on January 7, 1913. She was the widow of Joseph Louis Ball. Perhaps this is Aunt Han Ball. Does anyone know how she fits into our family tree?

I wonder how they traveled those 65 miles. (My father-in-law Lanny Gray read this and said that the family traveled a lot by train.) I wonder what prompted such a long visit. I wonder who Lester was.